dmolech:

I did a thing for a contest and I think it turned out pretty durn cute

(Reblogged from racebending)
We need more bisexual girls in fiction. Happy out and proud. Sad and closeted and scared. Bi girls of color. Trans and genderqueer and two-spirit bi characters. Bi characters who don’t know they’re bi until someone tells them bisexuality is real. Bi girls pretending to be straight. Bi girls pretending to be lesbians. Immigrant bi girls who have got bigger issues to worry about than being bi. With more diversity in our bi girls in fiction, one bi girl character with internalized biphobia won’t stick out so terribly.
(via raggedyanndy)

(Source: bisexual-books)

(Reblogged from seananmcguire)

Most girls are relentlessly told that we will be treated how we demand to be treated. If we want respect, we must respect ourselves.

This does three things. Firstly, it gets men off the hook for being held accountable for how they treat women. And secondly, it makes women feel that the mistreatment and sometimes outright violence they face due to their gender is primarily their fault. And thirdly, it positions women to be unable to speak out against sexism because we are made to believe any sexism we experience would not have happened if we had done something differently.

I cannot demand a man to respect me. No more than I can demand that anybody do anything. I can ask men to be nice to me. But chances are if I even have to ask he does not care to be nice. I can express displeasure when I’m not being respected. But that doesn’t solve the issue that I was disrespected in the first place.

I can choose to not deal with a man once he proves to be disrespectful and/or sexist. But even that does not solve the initial problem of the fact that I had to experience being disrespected in the first place.

As a young girl, I wish that instead of being told that I needed to demand respect from men that I had been told that when I am not respected by men that it’s his fault and not mine. But that would require that we quit having numerous arbitrary standards for what it means to be a “respectable” woman. It would mean that I am not judged as deserving violence based on how I speak, what I wear, what I do, and who I am.

(Reblogged from seananmcguire)

catherinedeneuev:

This is such an important yet underrated scene.

(Source: meryylstreep)

(Reblogged from sarahreesbrennan)


Ornately carved 17th century violin by Luther Ralph Agutter

Ornately carved 17th century violin by Luther Ralph Agutter

(Source: centuriesbehind)

(Reblogged from cleolinda)
In the instances when POC say shit like ‘Oh I can’t stand white folk’ or ‘Damn white people’, they aren’t saying ‘Oh I think they are inferior, I want to humiliate them, abuse them, enslave them and wipe out their people!’, they’re saying ‘Damn, after a couple hundred years of white people thinking I’m inferior, humiliating me, abusing me, enslaving me, and trying to wipe out my people, I don’t wanna deal with them.’ The context is completely different.

Briana (via absinthedisco)

Reblogging every time I see it.

(via dr—grumbles)

(via quelinda-anijinha)

Also, if you have a friend or acquaintance who says they hate white people at you, or in your presence, that doesn’t mean a) they hate you too, or b) you’re a special snowflake who is exempt becuase you know a person of color. It means you’re a good friend and they know they can vent that in your general direction and you’re not going to be a shit-fuck and say ” but that’s not all white people.”

(via ktempest)

(Source: chumpkaboo)

(Reblogged from seananmcguire)
People are uncomfortable with sexuality that is not made for male consumption.
Erykah Badu  (via nolabird)

(Source: thegentlemanjigger)

(Reblogged from karyngood)
One of the most disturbing scenes in Disney’s “Aladdin” is when Jasmine must pretend to seduce Jaffar in order to distract him. The clothing that the animators chose to put her in, complete with the shackles, are all a white, colonial wet dream. And she’s the only Disney princess who’s had to use her body in this way to distract someone. Then there’s this scene in “The Hunchback of Notre Dame” where Esmeralda is shimmying her hips and breasts and basically ends with a pole-dance sequence: a far cry from the delicate waltzes and pirouettes that Belle and Aurora dance. The simultaneous fascination and revulsion that Whiteness has for WOC bodies are unmistakably evident in Disney’s posturing of Jasmine and Esmeralda.

The Jasmine Diaries Part II: ‘Exotic’ is not a Compliment

(via marfmellow)

A perfect example of “desert flower” fetishization/exotification. Women of color are always shown as “others”, they’re seen as women who have to use their sexuality to save themselves (or worse, as people who are just inherently sexual by their mere existence).

We’re putting these sexualized images of women of color into cartoons meant for children, essentially brainwashing them to grow into adults who fetishize non-white women. Gross.

(via callingoutbigotry)

(Reblogged from racebending)

(Source: sansalayned)

(Reblogged from jennytrout)
heatherwpetty:

I don’t even watch GoT/read the books, and this is still the ending that I wish for most. 

heatherwpetty:

I don’t even watch GoT/read the books, and this is still the ending that I wish for most. 

(Source: labyrinthresource)

(Reblogged from heatherwpetty)

findchaos:

ChaosLife: Homo Hint

Wait, everyone else met Pete the Peacock, right?

(Reblogged from seananmcguire)

allwereallyneedisweed:

heartbreakmakesyouwiser:

To whoever made this you are a fucking genius my friend

Go ahead llamas
(Reblogged from seananmcguire)

"Sometimes you try your hardest, but things don’t work out the way you want them to. Sometimes things have to change, and maybe sometimes they’re for the better.

(Source: princekristof)

(Reblogged from seananmcguire)

beatonna:

Here is a sketch comic I made called Ducks, in five parts.

Part One

Part Two

Part Three

Part Four

Part Five

Ducks is about part of my time working at a mining site in Fort McMurray, the events are from 2008.  It is a complicated place, it is not the same for all, and these are only my own experiences there.  It is a sketch because I want to test how I would tell these stories, and how I feel about sharing them.  A larger work gets talked about from time to time.  It is not a place I could describe in one or two stories.  Ducks is about a lot of things, and among these, it is about environmental destruction in an environment that includes humans.  Thank you for taking the time to read it.

-Kate

(Reblogged from beatonna)
Other parts of ancient Eurasia had traditions of third-gender spirit-people. Herodotus and Hippocrates both discuss the “enarees”, or male-to-female transsexual shamans among the ancient Scythians, who “mutilated” their genitalia and took on female roles. They were said to be the most powerful shamans of their people. Ovid actually claimed that some Scythian priestesses knew how to extract “female poison” distilled from the urine of a mare in heat, with which to dose men in order to feminize them. The average person might throw this off as silliness, if they didn’t know that pregnant mare’s urine is the main source of Premarin, the most widely used estrogen drug today. They also ate a lot of licorice root - so popular among them that the Greeks to whom they exported it referred to it as “the Scythian root” - which is also an anti-androgen.

Ergi - The Way of the Third (via regionalholidaycaptain)

yesssssss

(via baeddelaire)

I love trans history!

(via rambleonamazon)

(RELEVENT)

I would FUCKING LOVE to see a comprehensive trans history book, that especially covered the history of HRT, I’ve always had questions but never really had answers!

(via transgalacticwanderer)

especially after YEARS of our HISTORY BEING ERASED and pushed under the rug to make cis people comfortable, and say that “trans people id a modern thing” to be able to show up and take out a history book and be like BOOM shut the hell up.

(via rosescarletfairy)

(Source: bad-mojo)

(Reblogged from fozmeadows)