1. wonderous-world:

Hell Valley, Japan by Marty Windle
    Reblogged from: wonderous-world
  2. medievalpoc:

I must admit that I probably need to print this out for my fridge <3
[relevance]

    medievalpoc:

    I must admit that I probably need to print this out for my fridge <3

    [relevance]

    Reblogged from: medievalpoc
  3. medievalpoc:

the-history-of-fighting:

Dahomey’s Warrior Women

Speaking of West Africa, the Dahomey Warrior Women involves a fascinating history that spans nearly 200 years. It was during this time that the elite squad of female warriors fought and died for the border rights and inter-tribal issues in the ancient kingdom of Dahomey.
These women, who outranked their male counterparts, were given far more privileges, including the ability to  come and go from the palaces as they pleased (unlike the men). They were so revered for their warrior prowess, The Smithsonian explains, that men were taught to keep their distance:
“Recruiting women into the Dahomean army was not especially difficult, despite the requirement to climb thorn hedges and risk life and limb in battle. Most West African women lived lives of forced drudgery. Gezo’s female troops lived in his compound and were kept well supplied with tobacco, alcohol and slaves – as many as 50 to each warrior, according to the noted traveler Sir Richard Burton, who visited Dahomey in the 1860s. And “when amazons walked out of the palace,” notes Alpern, “they were preceded by a slave girl carrying a bell. The sound told every male to get out of their path, retire a certain distance, and look the other way.” To even touch these women meant death.”
Yet as colonialist ambitions grew in the region, the Dahomey female warriors eventually grew sparse. Fierce combat missions to crush the independent kingdom eventually succeeded, and in the 1940s, it is said that the last of the female warriors died.
www.care2.com


I’ve posted about this incredible military force for 1800s Week previously, and you can read more about women warriors of color in this Masterpost. There’s also Amazons of Black Sparta: The Women Warriors of Dahomey by Stanley B. Alpern.

    medievalpoc:

    the-history-of-fighting:

    Dahomey’s Warrior Women

    Speaking of West Africa, the Dahomey Warrior Women involves a fascinating history that spans nearly 200 years. It was during this time that the elite squad of female warriors fought and died for the border rights and inter-tribal issues in the ancient kingdom of Dahomey.

    These women, who outranked their male counterparts, were given far more privileges, including the ability to  come and go from the palaces as they pleased (unlike the men). They were so revered for their warrior prowess, The Smithsonian explains, that men were taught to keep their distance:

    “Recruiting women into the Dahomean army was not especially difficult, despite the requirement to climb thorn hedges and risk life and limb in battle. Most West African women lived lives of forced drudgery. Gezo’s female troops lived in his compound and were kept well supplied with tobacco, alcohol and slaves – as many as 50 to each warrior, according to the noted traveler Sir Richard Burton, who visited Dahomey in the 1860s. And “when amazons walked out of the palace,” notes Alpern, “they were preceded by a slave girl carrying a bell. The sound told every male to get out of their path, retire a certain distance, and look the other way.” To even touch these women meant death.”

    Yet as colonialist ambitions grew in the region, the Dahomey female warriors eventually grew sparse. Fierce combat missions to crush the independent kingdom eventually succeeded, and in the 1940s, it is said that the last of the female warriors died.

    www.care2.com

    I’ve posted about this incredible military force for 1800s Week previously, and you can read more about women warriors of color in this Masterpost. There’s also Amazons of Black Sparta: The Women Warriors of Dahomey by Stanley B. Alpern.

    Reblogged from: medievalpoc
  4. woodendreams:

(by Tony Mearman)
    Reblogged from: woodendreams
  5. Reblogged from: carnivalerian
  6. roachpatrol:
    Reblogged from: maryrobinette
  7. Reblogged from: cleolinda
    • rochester: accuses jane of bewitching his horse
    • rochester: interrogates jane about her paintings
    • rochester: leaves jane abruptly for months at a time
    • rochester: stages an engagement with a hot rich aristocrat to hurt jane's feelings
    • rochester: dresses up as a fortune teller to mess with jane's head
    • rochester: neglects to tell jane about the murderous insane wife living in his attic
    • rochester: wait jane why are you leaving
    • Word up.
    • http: //sarahtales.livejournal.com/193457.html
    Reblogged from: sarahreesbrennan
  8. wolverxne:

Timber Wolf ~ by: Michael Cummings
    Reblogged from: wonderous-world
  9. themarysue:

    Daisy Steiner appreciation post.

    Reblogged from: themarysue
  10. pluckyyoungdonna:

    duchessofdeviance:

    securelyinsecure:

    Clair Huxtable shutting down men’s outdated opinions on female menstruation (◡‿◡✿)

    Clair was always dropping truth bombs…

    but why we still saying this stuff 30 years later?

    life goals

    Reblogged from: maryrobinette
  11. Romeo can’t really be blamed for Ophelia’s death.

    Senior English major on a Shakespeare final. (via minininny)

    WELL THEY’RE NOT WRONG

    ——

    How about this, though?

    image

    [Editorial Note: This “theory” depends on believing the Romeo and Juliet and Hamlet take place contemporaneously. So, for the sake of argument, let’s all agree that the events of both plays occur in the Spring of 1517 (chosen because of Martin Luther’s 95 Theses, and the Reformational threads that run through Hamlet).]

    See, in the Second Quarto and First Folio versions of Romeo and Juliet, a[n extremely minor] character appears with Romeo, Mercutio, and Benvolio at the Capulet’s Party (where, if you recall, Romeo meets Juliet for the first time).

    Like Hamlet's Horatio, this Horatio is full of well-worded philosophical advice. He tells Romeo “And to sink in it should you burden love, too great oppression for a tender thing.”

    image

    Fig. 1 - Second Quarto Printing

    image

    Fig. 2 - First Folio Printing

    [The American Shakespeare Center’s Education Blog discusses the likely “real” reasons for Horatio’s presence]

    Let’s imagine that Horatio has travelled down from Wittenberg (about 540 miles) to Verona for his Spring Break. He hears about some guys who like to party (because, let’s be honest, besides getting stabbed, partying is Mercutio’s main thing). So, he ends up crashing the Capulet’s ball with them.

    He is then on the sidelines as Romeo and Juliet fall in love, Tybalt kills Mercutio, Romeo kills Tybalt, Romeo gets banished, and both lovers are found dead in Juliet’s tomb.

    This tragedy fresh in his mind, he returns to Wittenberg at the end of what has turned out to be a decidedly un-radical Spring Break and discovers that his bestie Prince Hamlet is leaving for Elsinore Castle because he’s just gotten news that his father, the King, is dead.

    On the trip up (another ~375 miles), Horatio recounts the tragic romance he just witnessed in Verona. He advises (as he is wont to do) Hamlet not to mix love and revenge.

    Hamlet takes Horatio’s advice to heart, breaking up with Ophelia so that he can focus is energy on discovering and punishing his father’s killer:

    HAMLET
    Ay, truly; for the power of beauty will sooner
    transform honesty from what it is to a bawd than the
    force of honesty can translate beauty into his
    likeness: this was sometime a paradox, but now the
    time gives it proof. I did love you once.

    OPHELIA

    Indeed, my lord, you made me believe so.

    HAMLET

    You should not have believed me; for virtue cannot
    so inoculate our old stock but we shall relish of it: I loved you not.

    Ophelia - burdened by the perceived loss of Hamlet’s love and his murder of her father - goes mad and drowns herself.

    You see, if Romeo had waited literally a minute and thirty seconds longer (31 iambic pentametrical lines) - he, Juliet, Ophelia (and possibly the rest of the Hamlet characters) would have made it.

    * With thanks to roguebelle.

    (via thefeminineending)

    Buncha fuckin nerds in this town.

    (via moriartini)

    The Hamratiophelia Conspiracy Theory ftw

    (via zahnie)

    Reblogged from: cleolinda
  12. halfhardtorock:

lokisgift:

particularscarf:

bacon-radio:

historicaltimes:

Normandy landing that you didnt see. 1944

Red Cross workers.

That is seriously the most badass thing I’ve ever seen.

… i hate to feel like asking: this is for real right?

From the Red Cross page.

    halfhardtorock:

    lokisgift:

    particularscarf:

    bacon-radio:

    historicaltimes:

    Normandy landing that you didnt see. 1944

    Red Cross workers.

    That is seriously the most badass thing I’ve ever seen.

    … i hate to feel like asking: this is for real right?

    From the Red Cross page.

    Reblogged from: themarysue
  13. chescaleigh:

    soulrevision:

    For further understanding, see Kathleen Cleaver’s (of the Black Panther Party) interview where she addresses natural hair: 

    You can follow each of these women on their twitter accounts:

    Karnythia

    MoreAndAgain

    SoulRevision

    chescaleigh

    FYI these tweets are in response to this Curly Nikki post & the tweets that followed from @waterlily716

    Reblogged from: seananmcguire
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